IN THEATRE


MOFFIE
MOFFIE
(104 NR) 2021 South Africa Oliver Hermanus, director
Opens Aug 12
Just released in cinemas, Moffie is a devastating look back at the apartheid nation of South Africa in 1981. Soft-spoken 16-year-old Nicholas Van der Swart (Kai Luke Brummer) is serving two years of compulsory military service on the Angolan border. For Nicholas, the experience is life-changing, as he explores his sexuality with a fellow soldier. But challenging the strict status quo makes it clear – that racism, toxic masculinity and homophobia go hand in hand.  

Thursday, Aug 12 7:30 PM

Past Films

PIG
PIG
(92 R) 2021 USA Written & Directed by Michael Sarnoski, director
Don’t be surprised to see Nicholas Cage receive his second Academy Awards Best Actor win for the indie film Pig, and a comeback performance is understated, funny and raw. As a former Portland chef, Cage finds solace from his wife’s death in truffle hunting with the help of his companion, Pig. When Pig is abducted, Cage leaves the forest to search for him in Portland’s restaurant subculture. More atmospheric mystery than thriller, Pig celebrates artistic authenticity over making a quick buck. NYT Critic's Pick.

I CARRY YOU WITH ME
I CARRY YOU WITH ME
(111 R) Mexico, United States Heidi Ewing, director
    The first narrative film by documentarian Heidi Ewing (Jesus Camp) is based on the true-life journey of a Mexican chef with the dream of bringing his unique style of cooking to New York City. The film opens with Iván Garcia (Armando Espitia) as a young man in homophobic Puebla, cleaning tables and planning his escape. Falling head over heels for a grad student named Gerardo (Christian Vazquez), Garcia is torn by his quest, and the risk of never seeing Gerardo again. “With mouthwatering close-ups of the food Ivan lovingly prepares, Ewing’s film, for all its painful conflicts, never stints on the lyrical pleasures of life.” Ann Hornaday, Washington Post

SUMMER OF SOUL (...Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised)
SUMMER OF SOUL (...Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised)
(117 PG-13) 2021 Questlove, director
“What would have happened if this had been allowed a seat at the table?” The unanswerable question by Questlove (DJ, producer, drummer for The Roots) is about the Harlem Cultural Festival in 1969. Blown away by the forgotten footage, Questlove made a film celebrating performers including Stevie Wonder, Sly and the Family Stone, Max Roach, and Nina Simone -  not to mention Mahalia Jackson and Mavis Staples in a heartrending tribute to Martin Luther King Jr.

MILKWATER
MILKWATER
(101) Written & Directed by Morgan Ingari, director
Morgan Ingari’s first film is a bittersweet comedy that lives in the sweet spot of the zeitgeist. Molly Bernard (Younger) plays a 20-something Brooklynite who feels less successful with each friend’s marriage or step up the career ladder. Drowning her insecurity at a local bar, she becomes friendly with an older gay man who desperately want to be a father. And while surrogacy seems to be the solution, misunderstandings threaten their beautiful dream.

TRUMAN & TENNESSEE: AN INTIMATE CONVERSATION
TRUMAN & TENNESSEE: AN INTIMATE CONVERSATION
(81) Lisa Immordino Vreeland, director
Truman & Tennessee celebrates the friendship of two American writers, mixing footage of Capote and Williams with excerpts from their revealing correspondence. Both authors grew up in the pre-WW II South, where being gay was hidden and dangerous. Nevertheless, they went on to write some of the 20th century’s best books (Breakfast at Tiffany’s), and plays (A Streetcar Named Desire) that are tinged with an appreciation for the misunderstood and the outcasts.

IN THE HEIGHTS
IN THE HEIGHTS
(143 PG-13) 2021 USA Jon M. Chu, director
Treat yourself to the spirit-recharging movie of the summer, with the brilliant songwriting of Lin-Manuel Miranda (Hamilton). Just like West Side Story and Saturday Night Fever, The Heights was filmed in New York City, capturing all of its kinetic energy. The film follows two couples: Usnavi & Vanessa  played by Anthony Ramos and Melissa Barrera; and Benny (taxi dispatcher) & Nina, (Stanford student). But it’s the Heights’ Latino community –its music and stubborn belief in the American Dream – that touches the soul.

LA PISCINE
LA PISCINE
(124) 1969 France/Italy Jacques Deray, director
Cinestudio kicks off its Summer of Cinema with a dazzling 4K restoration of a sun-saturated psychological thriller, directed by Jacques Deray, known as “the French Hitchcock.” The film opens with two lovers (equally gorgeous Alain Delon and Romy Schneider) on vacation in a villa in St. Tropez. Their languorous interlude is disrupted by the arrival of Schneider’s amorous ex (Maurice Ronet) and his 18-year old daughter, played by a touchingly young Jane Birkin.

SUNFLOWERS
SUNFLOWERS
(90) David Bickerstaff, director
Exhibition on Screen opens the doors to an extraordinary show in Amsterdam’s Van Gogh Museum, that brings together five of the Dutch artist’s iconic Sunflower paintings from London, Philadelphia, Tokyo, Munich and Amsterdam. Why was Van Gogh obsessed with the exotic sunflower, and how does each painting change from version to version? What were scientists able to discover when they analysed the works? All is revealed in this dazzling film, shown in high-definition on Cinestudio’s immersive screen.        

THE HUMAN VOICE & WOMEN ON THE VERGE OF A NERVOUS BREAKDOWN
THE HUMAN VOICE & WOMEN ON THE VERGE OF A NERVOUS BREAKDOWN
(119 R) 2021 & 1988 Spain Two Films Written and Directed by Pedro Almodóvar, director
The Human Voice. 2020 robbed moviegoers of so much, it also inspired some directors to experiment. Pedro Almodóvar responded with a fantastic short film based on Jean Cocteau’s monologue of a woman on the telephone with her faithless lover – now updated and starring a more independent Tilda Swinton. Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown. Even before remaking The Human Voice, Almodóvar was inspired by its rejected woman driven to despair in his 1988 classic movie. But in Madrid, angst morphs into comedy, as Carmen Maura tries to track down her lover. It’s a wild adventure including barbiturate-spiked gazpacho, accidental hookups with terrorists, and the possibilities of turning rivals into comrades.

PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN
PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN
(113 R) Written and directed by Emerald Fennell, director
Winner of the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay, Promising Young Woman gleefully exposes rape culture and the harm that (some) men are capable of inflicting. Emerald Fennell’s funny, pastel-toned and provocative movie stars Carey Mulligan (Never Let Me Go) as Cassie, whose time in med school was derailed by a friend’s sexual assault. Burning with rage, she works in a coffee shop by day and picks up unsuspecting bros by night… to give them a taste of their own nasty medicine.

DRY WIND (Vento Seco)
DRY WIND (Vento Seco)
(110) Brazil Written and directed by Daniel Nolasco., director
OUTFILM CT presents May’s Queer Thursdays electrifying selection: a neon fantasia of erotic discovery set in the rustic (and conservative) Catalan countryside warmed by an insinuating dry wind. Filmmaker Daniel Nolasco follows the yearnings of Sandro (Leandro Faria Lelo), a shy, hunky bear who spices up his life as a factory manager with explicit sexual encounters—both real and imagined.

TRINITY FILM FESTIVAL 2021
TRINITY FILM FESTIVAL 2021
Celebrate undergraduate short films at the World Premiere of the 10th Annual Trinity Film Festival! Every year, Trinity Film Festival offers undergraduates from around the world the opportunity to premiere their short films on the big screen for an audience of peers, professionals, and local filmgoers. This year we are happy to hold both an online as well as an in-person screening of these films.

MA RAINEY'S BLACK BOTTOM
MA RAINEY'S BLACK BOTTOM
(94 R) George C. Wolfe, director
The final performance of 43-year-old Chadwick Boseman is a powerful film based on a play by the great August Wilson. Viola Davis plays pioneering blues artist Ma Rainey, who struggled to for control in an industry run by white men. It is set in a 1920s Chicago recording studio where everyone’s desires are at odds: an ambitious cornet player (Boseman) wants to promote his songs, white producers want a hit, and Ma Rainey fights to keep Black culture alive and swinging.

THE FATHER
THE FATHER
(97 PG-13) 2012 Written and directed by Florian Zeller, based on Zeller’s play., director
Cinestudio presents another Academy Award-films nominated for Best Picture, for everyone who hasn’t been able to see it in a real cinema! The Father also picked up nominations for Best Actor and Best Supporting Actress for Anthony Hopkins and Olivia Coleman, who play a man struggling with dementia, and his frustrated but loving daughter. What stands out is French writer/director Florian Zeller’s choice to see the world through the father’s eyes. In refusing to limit Hopkins’s character to a victim, The Father asks questions of memories, consciousness and compassion that affect everyone.

MINARI
MINARI
(120 PG-13) Written and directed by Lee Isaac Chung, director
Cinestudio is pleased to present one of the best films of 2020 on the big screen. Nominated for six Academy Awards, including the first for an Asian American woman for Best Picture and Best Actor. Yeun plays a Korean immigrant who moves his wife and two young children from Los Angeles to rural Arkansas, to grow and sell Korean vegetables though his wife Monica isn't sure about the trailer home. For the children, it's their grandmother who links an immigrant past to their life in the Ozarks.


«
»